HOW MUCH PROTECTION DO YOU NEED?


A risk assessment at a workplace begins with an analysis of all the potential hazards. The findings from this study help in determining suitable garments that offer the correct level of protection and the best comfort. We provide personal protective workwear solutions for almost all occupations, working conditions and – not least – for all your risk assessments. Examples of hazards are thermal hazards: high convective heat, high radiant heat, flame contact, steam, molten metals and hot surfaces & electric hazards: high voltage, electric arc and static charge build-up.
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Below you find a few examples of hazards in different occupations and according to which certifications the protective clothing must be approved. Also more information about the different certificates and garment recommendations which meets the demands.  

RISK ASSESSMENTS

RISK ASSESSMENT:
ELECTRICIAN

riskanalys elektriker fristads
  • Protection from contact with heat and flame (EN ISO 11612).

  • Protective clothing against thermal hazards that may occur in electric arc accidents , tested according to IEC 61482-2.

  • ATPV/EBT value of at least   8 cal/cm2  is the general guideline. If the risk is higher, we recommend you to wear several layers of certified garments or garments with higher arc-rating.

RISK ASSESSMENT:
WELDER

riskanalys svetsare fristads
  • Protection from contact with heat and flame (EN 11612).

  • Protection against welding sparks  (EN ISO 11611).

  • Gaments suitable for welding have fewer pockets and functional details than other garments.   

  • Often used in conjunktion with other PPE, e.g. welding apron, helmet and gloves.

RISK ASSESSMENT:
RAIL WORKER

riskanalys banarbetare fristads
  • Protection from contact with heat and flame (EN 11612).

  • Garments making the wearer visibile to their surroundings in daylight, at night and in poor weather conditions (EN ISO 20471).

  • Some workers in this group also need garments certfied   according to  EN ISO 11611  for welding or similar work.

RISK ASSESSMENT:
​​​​​​​OIL INDUSTRIAL WORKER

riskanalys oljearbetare fristads
  • Protection from contact with heat and flame (EN 11612).

  • Protection against sudden discharge of electrostatic energy, where there is a risk that static sparks may ignite flammable substances such as gas or oil (EN 1149-5).

  • Conductive material sush as metal zippers or buttons must be concealed.

  • Protection against rain and high visibility (EN 20471) are also often important for this group.

NORMS & CERTIFICATIONS

ELECTRIC ARC

Protective clothing tested according to IEC 61482-2 protects you from thermal hazards  that  may occur in electric arc accidents.

WHO NEEDS PROTECTION AGAINST ELECTRIC ARC?  
Electricians, when servicing equipment in non-arc-safe distribution plants or electrical switchboards, or when working with high-voltage equipment.

PROTECTION AGAINST
  • Electric arc
  • Metal splashes
  • Heat and flame
  • Radiant heat
  • Conductive heat
  • High voltage
  • Plasma clouds
  • Radiation
WE RECOMMEND


When there is a risk of being exposed to an electric arc, for example, when servicing equipment in non-arc-safe distribution plants or electrical switchboards, or when working on high voltage equipment, personnel are recommended to wear arc-approved protective clothing.
What protection does your clothing need to provide during an arc blast?
The plasma clouds, flames, radiation and metal splashes from the electrodes hit the fabric during an arc blast. When this occurs, the fabric has to provide sufficient insulation to prevent second-degree skin burns. An effective fabric used in an arc garment must provide shielding against the flame and metal splashes, as well as insulation from the intense heat. The standard IEC 61482-2 includes two test methods, EN 61482-1-1 (open arc) and EN 61482-1-2 (box test). Our garments are certified according to both test methods or one of them.  

The garments must cover the whole body. For example, a jacket and trousers must be worn together with other personal protective equipment (PPE), including a helmet with protective visor, protective gloves and protective footwear (boots) to achieve the correct level of protection. Layering is very important and will increase protection – if you wear flame retardant underwear underneath your flame retardant garments you are protected for even better.

HEAT AND FLAME

Protective clothing approved according to  EN ISO 11612 protecting the user from contact with heat and flame.  

WHO NEEDS PROTECTION AGAINST HEAT AND FLAME?  
  • Electricians
  • Industrial workers
  • Miners
  • Road- and railworkers
  • Welders
  • Foundry workers
  • Off-shore
  • Energy
  • Refinery
  • Maintanance
PROTECTION AGAINST
  • Limited flame spread (A)
  • Convective heat (B)
  • Radiant heat (C)
  • Molten aluminium splash (D)
  • Molten iron splash (E)
  • Contact heat (F)​​​​​​​
WE RECOMMEND
All our garments are certified to protect against heat and flames. For protection against molten iron and aluminium se code letter  E below.

Two-piece protective clothing must be worn together to provide the specified level of protection. The CE-label inside the garment states the required garment-assembly. The CE-label inside the garment states to which code letters the garment are certified. The higher level, the better. The following code letters are describing the performance of the garments.

A: Limited flame spread
A1 - Surface ignition
A2 - Edge ignition

B: Protection against convective heat
B1 – B3
Convective heat is the heat that passes through the garment when in contact with flame. If there is an outer fabric that does not burn, injury may nevertheless occur due to the heat that forms when the fabric – and, indirectly, the body – comes into contact with the  flame.
C: Protection against radiant heat
C1 – C4
Low radiant heat over a long period can result in a risk of injury.

D: Protection against molten aluminum splash
D1 – D3

E: Protection against molten iron splash
E1 – E3
Even if the fabric does not start to burn or decay in contact with the molten metal, you can still get burns. The test indicates how many molten metal splashes the fabric can withstand before protection is compromised.

F: Protection against contact heat
F1 – F3
Contact heat over a long period can result in risk of injury.

WELDING

Protective clothing certified according  EN ISO 11611  for use in welding or allied processes. The  standard has two classes with specific protection levels. Class 1 is the lower, and class 2 the higher level.

WHO NEEDS WELDING PROTECTION?
  • Welders
  • Rail-workers
  • Miners
  • Foundry workers
PROTECTION AGAINST
  • Welding sparks
  • UV radiation
  • Heat and flame
WE RECOMMEND


Garments for welders have fewer pockets and functional details than other garments and are often used together with welding apron, helmet and gloves.   In electric arc-welding operations there is a risk of exposure of skin to Ultraviolet (UV) radiation. During use the fabric of the clothing will degrade. Examine the garments regularly to prevent exposure to UV radiation. If user experience sunburn-like symptoms, UVB is penetrating. If garment is found to be penetrated by UV radiation, it should be repaired (if practicable) or replaced and the use of additional, more resistant protective layers should be considered in future. Two-piece protective clothing must be worn together to provide the specified level of protection. The CE-label inside the garment states the required garment-assembly. Using additional partial protective garments, the basic garment shall meet at least Class 1. Use of welding apron which covers the front body at least from side seam to side seam is recommended. Additional partial body protection may be required, e.g. for welding overhead.

ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE - ATEX ENVIRONMENT

Certified and approved protective clothing against  electrostatic discharge according to EN 1149-5.

WHO NEEDS PROTECTION IN EXPLOSIVE RISK ENVIRONMENTS?
  • Workers in petro-chemistry
  • Energy
  • Refinery
  • Maintanance
  • Off-shore
PROTECTION AGAINST
Static electricity, which can cause sparks.

WE RECOMMEND

The person wearing electrostatic dissipative clothing shall be properly earthed. The resistance between the person and the earth shall be less than 108 Ω, e.g. by wearing adequate footwear. Electrostatic dissipative protective clothing shall not be opened or removed whilst in presence of flammable or explosive atmospheres or while handling flammable or explosive substances. The garment shall permanently cover all non-compliant material during normal use, including bending and movements

LIQUID CHEMICALS, TYPE PB*

Protective clothing tested according to EN 13034 offers protection against liquid chemical splashes.

WHO NEEDS PROTECTION AGAINST CHEMICAL SPLASH?
  • Industial workers
  • Miners
  • Workers in petro-chemistry
  • Energy
  • Refinery
  • Maintenance
  • Off-shore
PROTECTION AGAINST

Chemical splashes

Important:  The standard describes clothing that has been tested for repellency to chemical splashes, not resistance to permeation of chemicals! The clothing gives protection against specific named chemicals.
  • Sulphuric acid, H2SO4, 30%
  • Sodium hydroxide, NaOH, 10%
  • O-Xylene, undiluted
  • Butan-1-ol, undiluted
WE RECOMMEND
FLAMESTAT GORE-TEX®
FLAMESTAT MULTINORM ATHS
FLAMESTAT MULTINORM ATHP

*PB=Partial Body protection
Please note: Adequate treatment must be added to the washing process minimum for every 5th washing cycle.